TV’s World Series Starts This Week

It is also TV’s World Series.

 

 

Most people who are watching the 2017 World Series between the Houston Astros and the Los Angeles Dodgers really don’t care about TV ratings. They have an interest in the event because they are baseball fans or people might to know what is happening so they can talk about it at home, at work or at a social function. But there are those at TV networks that will watch the ratings very closely because it means money. The World Series gets very important to FOX and TV competitors, NBC, CBS and ABC on Friday because it is TV sweeps month. The World Series of TV begins on Friday when ratings matter more than they do for the first two games of the World Series. FOX will more than likely win the viewership contest with games three and four of the World Series and if there is a game 5 or a game six and a game seven even better for FOX. The network has a chance at winning five nights of a period that ends on November 22. Baseball ratings have fallen dramatically and baseball appeals to an older viewer which is a problem for the suits that run both the game and the TV portion of the business. Major League Baseball officials know that which is why they are attempting to modernize a 19th century game for a 21st century audience.

 

In 2015, CBS head Leslie Moonves was rooting for the Mets but business wise he knew it would be better business if Kansas City finished off the New York in four games. “There’s a part of me, even though I’m an old-school Mets fan, competitively, wants the over in four. I don’t want Fox to get three more of those great numbers.” A longer World Series means more ad revenues for FOX less for CBS and the other networks. November, February and May are ratings exams that set ad price.

 

The Los Angeles Dodgers players celebrate after Game 5 of baseball’s National League Championship Series against the Chicago Cubs, Thursday, Oct. 19, 2017, in Chicago. The Dodgers won 11-1 to win the series and advance to the World Series. Photo: AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast.
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