It Is Almost Time For Student-Athletes To Get Ready For Some College Football

Get the money makers ready.  

The National Collegiate Athletic Association is doing a favor for certain student-athletes, the football and basketball players who make the money for schools in college sports. On June 1st, the NCAA is allowing the workers back into school training facilities so they can get ready for the 2020-2021 college football and basketball seasons. The non-revenue producing sports employees, rather student-athletes, will stay on the sidelines for the time being during the COVID-19 pandemic. All of the workouts are voluntary which does not necessarily mean voluntary in the world of college sports. There seems to be an unwritten rule that the word voluntary means you should be there or risk losing a scholarship although NCAA personnel would never say that publicly. There will be a protocol governing the voluntary workouts for college students who are willing to risk their health in their non-paying jobs for the college or university, the coaches, the athletic department, the college presidents and chancellors, TV network, marketing partners and people who buy tickets to see them play. Local, state and federal regulations must be followed but since there are no uniform rules across the 50 states during the COVID-19 pandemic, regulations will be different in Missouri than in New Jersey.

Colleges and universities are struggling with the decision to reopen campuses. California state schools will not allow in classroom teaching in the fall months but other states will open up classrooms. The NCAA is monitoring the situation but the general consensus is that if a school’s campus is not physically open for students, then there will not be any college sports. Big-time football is all about money not necessarily health. Sports organizations are pushing to get product before the public with television providing the link with fans. Games will proceed with no fans in the stands. Sports organizations want the TV money.

(AP Photo/John Raoux, File)
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